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Drolet-Fortin family

  • Family

Napoléon Drolet, born in 1842, and married Adéline Rochette in Québec in 1864. They settled in Compton, where their twelve children were born: Thomas, Eugenie, Oliva, Emile, Marie Alma, Victor, Blanche, Adelina, Marie Louise, Léon C., Ernest, and Léontine. In 1909, the family relocated to Coaticook. Ernest studied at Université de Montréal, receiving his BA in pharmacology. He opened his practice in Coaticook, in the building known as “Medicine Hall.” Ernest Drolet married Émilie Fortin in 1909 in Cookshire and together they had one child: Antoinette (1910-1999). Antoinette married Ernest Délium Émond in 1945 in Montréal.
Joseph Alexandre Fortin (1846-1920) married Marie Joséphine Tremblay (1854-1928) in Roberval in 1872. At some point the couple moved to area of La Patrie, where some of their children were born. Together they had eight children: Adélard, Joseph Darly, Alfred, Émilie, Joseph François-Xavier, Arthur, Laura, and Alice. Xavier (1884-1976) married Blanche Roy (1895-1999). Émilie (1882-1963) married Ernest Casimir Drolet (1883-1919).
Lucien Roy married Ferdinanda Côté, probably in the area of Saint-Anaclet-de-Lessard in Rimouski. Among their children was Blanche Marie Fernanda Roy, born in 1895. Blanche married Xavier Joseph Fortin in Drummondville in 1919.

Dumoulin (family)

  • Family
  • 1901-

Pierre Dumoulin was born Coaticook on 17 May 1902 to Samuel Dumoulin and Cyrilda Paquette. Amarilda Larivière was born on 21 August 1901 to Dolor Larivière and Élise Bouvier. The couple married in Rock Island on 30 August 1920 and together they had the following children: Gertrude (1921-1992), Thérèse (b. 1923), Léonard (1924), Normand (1926), Madeleine (1927-2011), André (192-2011), Paul (1929-2010), Guy (1930), François (1932), Marcel (1934), Jacques (1935), Jean-Maurice (1936-2013), Rosaire (1937-2013), Charles-Auguste (1939), Jules (1940), Jean-Claude (1943), Luc (1945), and Vincent (1947-1966).
Jean-Maurice Dumoulin was born in Coaticook on 4 July 1936 to Pierre Dumoulin and Amarilda Larivière. As a young boy, he felt called by God to join the seminary. This decision was short-lived, however, and soon after he withdrew from the seminary and joined the choir instead. At the age of 14, he began his first job at Penman’s, and from the ages of 15 to 20 he worked in the evening at Coaticook Textile and on the weekends at Daigle & Frères, returning all his earnings to his mother. As an adult, Jean-Maurice left Coaticook for Montreal and eventually obtained a degree as a psycho-educator and worked for 20 years in Sherbrooke with mentally handicapped children. He married and had two children: Sarah and Nadia. He retired from teaching after 20 years and purchased a farm in Kingscroft. Following the dissolution of his marriage, Jean-Maurice sold the farm and worked as the custodian at the convent of La Présentation. During his lifetime, Jean-Maurice was involved in a variety of volunteer and community groups. He died on 7 February 2013 in Sherbrooke.

Copping, George (family)

  • Family
  • 18th cent.-20th cent.

(Generation 1) George Copping (1870-1949), born in Hatfield, Essex County, England, married Elizabeth Saggers (1782-1852), born in Chigwell, Essex County, England, in 1806 in London, England. The couple, along with their children immigrated to Quebec in 1811 and eventually settled in Rawdon by 1823. Among their eleven children were: George William (1807-1879), Henry (1818-1894), and William George (1808-1889).

(Generation 2) George W. Copping, son of George Copping and Elizabeth Saggers, married Mary Grey in Rawdon in 1830. Together they had ten children: John (b. 1831), Thomas (b. 1833), George (b. 1835), Elizabeth (b. 1837), Margaret (b. 1839), Mary E. (b. 1841), Ann (b. 1844), Charles (b. 1846), Sarah (b. 1848), and Jane (1851).

(Generation 3) John Copping, son of George W. Copping and Mary Grey, married Nancy Marlin in 1855 in Rawdon. Together they had three children: James Henry (b. 1857), Mary Jane, and John Alexander (b. 1868). John A. married Sarah Alice Mason in 1896 in Rawdon. The couple settled in Sand Hill after a short time in Comtpon until they moved to Lennoxville in 1945. They did not have any children. John died at the Sherbrooke Hospital in 1949. Alice died in 1960.

(Generation 3) Mary Ellen Copping, daughter of George W. Copping and Mary Grey, married Edward Mason in Rawdon in 1861. Together they had ten children: James Charles (b. 1862), Mary Ellen (b. 1864), Eliza Jane (b. 1865), George William (b. 1867), Annie Mariah (b. 1869), Sarah Alice (b. 1873), Charlotte Edith (b. 1877), Edward Armstrong (b. 1878), Thomas Albert (b. 1880), and Ethel Maude (b. 1882). Annie Mariah Mason married John Richard Copping. Mary Ellen Mason married Richard F. Boyce. Sarah Alice Mason married John Alex. Copping.

(Generation 3) Sarah Copping, daughter of George W. Copping and Mary Grey, married Samuel Dixon. She died in Cobden, Ontario in 1909.

(Generation 2) William G. Copping, son of Henry Copping and Elizabeth Saggers, married Margaret Gray in Rawdon in 1833. Together they had twelve children: Henry (b. 1834), William (1835-1836), George (b. 1838), Elizabeth (b. 1840), James (b. 1842), Thomas (b. 1844), William (b. 1845), John (b. 1847), Joseph (b. 1849), Charles (b. 1851), David (b. 1852), and Samuel (b. 1856). William died in 1889 in Rawdon. Among his children, George married Elizabeth Copping (daugther of Henry Copping and Jane Cook).

(Generation 2) Henry Copping, son of Henry Copping and Elizabeth Saggers, first married Jane Cook (ca. 1817-1846) in 1841 in Rawdon. Together they had three children: Mary (b. 1842), Elizabeth (b. 1844), and Jane (b. 1846). He married second Frances “Fannie” Harkness (1827-1872) in 1847 in Rawdon. Together they had eleven children: George (b. 1848), Ellen Maria (b. 1849), Jane L. (b. 1851), Sarah Ann (b. 1853), Henry (b. 1856), William Thomas (b. 1858), Margaret Frances (b. 1860), James Charles (b. 1862), John Richard (b. 1864), Clara Emiline (b. 1866), and Reuben (b. 1868). Henry Copping married third Mary Sinclair (ca. 1833-1887).

(Generation 3) Elizabeth Copping, daughter of Henry Copping and Jane Cook, married George Copping (son of Wiliam George Copping and Margaret Gray) in Montreal in 1870. Together they had six children: Helena, Clara Maude, Wiliam Henry Grey, Mary Alice, Melvin Francis, and Charles Clayton.

(Generation 3) Jane L. Copping, daughter of Henry Copping and Fannie/Frances Harkness, married John Johnston in Montreal 1874. Together they had five children: Violet, Victor, Augustus “Gus” Hyatt, Laura Sinclair, and John Walter.

(Generation 3) Sarah Ann “Lail” Copping, daughter of Henry Copping and Fannie/Frances Harkness, married James Barrow in Montreal in 1880. Together they had seven children: Lester, Hartley, Eleanor, Garnet, Grace, Hazel, and Douglas.

(Generation 3) John “Jack” Richard Copping, son of Henry Copping and Fannie/Frances Harkness, married Annie Mariah Mason in Montreal in 1893. Together they had one child: Vivian Iris.

(Generation 3) Reuben Copping, son of Henry Copping and Fannie/Frances Harkness, married Eliza Jane Mason in Montreal in 1894. Together they had three children: Laurence Edward, Reginald Lloyd, and Ruby Isabel. Reuben worked for a time in Montreal for Christie, Brown & Company, followed by the purchase of a farm in Sand Hill. He died in Sand Hill in 1929.

McIver, Lewis (family)

  • Family
  • 19th cent.-1925

Lewis McIver, son of Colin and Anne McIver, was born in Scotland around 1815. He immigrated to Canada and settled in Bury as a trader. He married Sarah Pope in Lingwick on 3 November 1852 and among their children were: Alexandrina Anne (b. 1853), Lilly Evandrina (b. 1855), and Alexander Lewis (b. 1856).

Alexander Lewis McIver (sometimes also written as MacIver), who also worked as a trader in Bury, married Selina K. Fauquier(?) and together they had three children: Eric (b. 1894), Nina (b. 1897), and Joan (b. 1901). It appears that Alexander Lewis moved to Ontario in 1915. Eric McIver served in World War I as an observer and pilot for the 7th Squadron of the Royal Flying Corps. He died in Oakville, Ontario on 29 October 1925, where he was working for the Tonopah Mining Company, following a sudden and brief illness.

Nicolls-Mountain

  • Family
  • 1805-1909

The Nicolls and Mountain families lived in Quebec and Lennoxville in the nineteenth century. The founders of the connection were George Jehoshaphat Mountain, a young Anglican clergyman, and Gustavus Nicolls, a Captain of Engineers. Mountain married Mary Hume Thomson, the daughter of a British official in Quebec in 1814. Nicolls married Mary Thomson's elder sister Heriot Frances, in 1812. Gustavus Nicolls became Commander of Royal Engineers in Canada, while Mountain became Bishop of Quebec. In 1845, Mountain appointed his nephew, Jasper Nicolls, the General's third son, as Principal of the newly established Anglican institution in Lennoxville, Bishop's College. Jasper fell in love with his cousin Harriet, the Bishop's daughter. They were married in Quebec in 1847. The correspondence which flowed between the Mountain family in Quebec and the Nicolls family in Lennoxville provided the basis for Ten Rings on the Oak, 1847-1856 by Donald C. Masters and Marjorie W. Masters.

Nicolls-Mountain

  • Family
  • 1805-1909

The Nicolls and Mountain families lived in Quebec and Lennoxville in the nineteenth century. The founders of the connection were George Jehoshaphat Mountain, a young Anglican clergyman, and Gustavus Nicolls, a Captain of Engineers. Mountain married Mary Hume Thomson, the daughter of a British official in Quebec in 1814. Nicolls married Mary Thomson's elder sister Heriot Frances, in 1812. Gustavus Nicolls became Commander of Royal Engineers in Canada, while Mountain became Bishop of Quebec. In 1845, Mountain appointed his nephew, Jasper Nicolls, the General's third son, as Principal of the newly established Anglican institution in Lennoxville, Bishop's College. Jasper fell in love with his cousin Harriet, the Bishop's daughter. They were married in Quebec in 1847. The correspondence which flowed between the Mountain family in Quebec and the Nicolls family in Lennoxville provided the basis for Ten Rings on the Oak, 1847-1856 by Donald C. Masters and Marjorie W. Masters.

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