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Authority record

Corporation de la gestion du Chemin des Cantons

  • C005
  • Corporate body
  • 2007-

Le Chemin des Cantons, also referred to as the Townships Trail was first launched in June 2007. The trail traverses over 30 towns, eight regional county municipalities and over 400 km of the Eastern Townships. The trail begins in Brome-Missisquoi and ends in Val-Saint-Francois. Following secondary routes, the Townships Trail explores the British, American, Scottish and Irish influence and legacy in the Eastern Townships through the 18th and 19th centuries. The trail is one among eight tourist routes recognized by Quebec’s Ministry of Transportation. It’s mandate is founded on showcasing the built and natural history and heritage of the Eastern Townships through the use of marked route signs. In addition to the trail signage, the Townships Trail also provides tourists with maps and audio guides that recount and narrate the memories, stories, and history through artists and locals from the region. First conceived in 2004, the cultural trail has materialized through a partnership between the municipalities, the Local Centres of Development for Haut-Saint Francois, the Regional Conference of Elected Officials of Estrie and Monteregie Est, the Quebec Anglophone Heritage Network, along with Tourism Eastern Townships.

The Corporation de la gestion du Chemin des Cantons is run by a Board of Directors of 15 members who are elected by the General Assembly for a period of two years. The members of the Board of Directors represent the eight regional county municipalities, Tourism Eastern Townships, the Conseil de la Culture de l’Estrie, the Anglophone Heritage Network, the friends of the Townships Trail and the Attrait-Etape. The Board of Directors also includes two co-opted members who are appointed by the Board. The Corporation de la gestion du Chemin des Cantons also has a coordinator Helene Deslauriers who has held this title since 2007. There are also a number of committees in charge of programming, routes, evaluation, marketing and relaunch.

Notable founding committee members of the route are : Julie Sage, secteur tourisme de Coaticook, Marc Cantin, secteur tourisme et culture Asbestos, Dominic Ferland, secteur culture memphremagog, Julie Pomerleau, secteur culture Haut-Saint Francois, Alain Deschatelets, Tourisme Sherbrooke, Josiane Ares, secteur culture Val- Saint Francois, Sylvie Vandal, Tourisme Granby Bromont, Denis Brisebois, DBSF, Sylvie Lamarche DBSF, Marie-France Bourdages, Tourisme Cantons-de-l’Est, Jocelyne Jacques, ministere de la culture et des communications, Line Brault, CLD Brome- Missisquoi, Melanie Duranleau CLC Haut St Francois, Dominic Ferland MRC Memphremagog, Jacynthe Ferland, CLD Val St-Francois, Jocelyne Jacques, MCC, Shirley Lavertue, MRC Coaticook, Diane St- Jacques, CLD Haut-St Francois, and Helene Deslauriers, Route Culturelle- Tourisme Cantons-de-l’Est.

Corey, Irving Ross

  • Person

Irving Ross Corey married Alice Baldwin in 1948. Around 1950, he and Alice moved from Montreal to Kimberly, British Columbia. Ross died in 2001 and is buried at the Lakeview Cemetery in Baldwin's Mills.

Corey, Alice Lill Baldwin, 1928-1971

  • Person

Alice Lill Baldwin was born 7 January 1928 in Baldwin's Mills and was the youngest daughter of Harold F. Baldwin and Ruth S. May. In adolescence, she attended Stanstead College, in Stanstead, Quebec.

The 15 May 1948, Alice married I. Ross Corey and together they had 4 children. She and two of her sons died in a tragic car accident the 9 Nov 1971 in Esterhazy, Saskatchewan. Alice is buried at the Lakeview Cemetery in Baldwin's Mills.

Corey, Alice Lill

  • C006
  • Person
  • 1928-1971

Alice Lill Baldwin was born 7 January 1928 in Baldwin's Mills and was the youngest daughter of Harold F. Baldwin and Ruth S. May. In adolescence, she attended Stanstead College, in Stanstead, Quebec.

The 15 May 1948, Alice married I. Ross Corey and together they had 3 children: Christopher, Kathleen and Neil. She and two of her sons, Christopher and Neil, died in a tragic car accident 8 Nov 1971 in Esterhazy, Saskatchewan. Alice is buried at the Lakeview Cemetery in Baldwin's Mills.
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Cordy, Henry J., 1881-1972

Henry J. Cordy was born in 1881 in Suffield. He attended school in Eustis until 1898, when he started to work in Capelton for the Nichols Chemical Company, which exploited the Capelton mine at the end of the 19th century and beginning of the 20th century. Henry J. Cordy was married in 1908 in Guelph, Ont. to Florence May Cotton whom he met when she was living with her family in Albert Mines. They had three children. In Capelton, Henry J. Cordy was an office clerk from 1898 to 1905, chemist from 1905 to 1923, and superintendent from 1923 to 1925. In 1925, he was transferred to Sulphide, Ont., in 1941 to Valleyfield, and in 1946 to Montreal. He retired in 1952, after 54 years of service for the Nichols Chemical Company. Henry J. Cordy was a member of the Society of Chemical Industry and of the Chemical Institute of Canada. In 1949, the latter recognized his contribution to the profession of chemist by electing him Fellow of the Institute. Henry J. Cordy died in Valleyfield in 1972. Amateur photographer, Henry J. Cordy took photographs which depict the community life and the mining sites and chemical works of Capelton and Eustis at the beginning of the 20th century.

Corbet, Christian ( 1966-)

  • BUArtColl
  • Person
  • 1966-

Christian Cardell Corbet (born 31 January 1966) is a Canadian sculptor, painter and designer. He co-founded and was first President of the Canadian Portrait Academy. He is the Regimental Sculptor of the Royal Canadian Regiment and Sculptor in Residence for the Royal Canadian Navy. He resides in Sackville, New Brunswick.

Copping, George (family)

  • Family
  • 18th cent.-20th cent.

(Generation 1) George Copping (1870-1949), born in Hatfield, Essex County, England, married Elizabeth Saggers (1782-1852), born in Chigwell, Essex County, England, in 1806 in London, England. The couple, along with their children immigrated to Quebec in 1811 and eventually settled in Rawdon by 1823. Among their eleven children were: George William (1807-1879), Henry (1818-1894), and William George (1808-1889).

(Generation 2) George W. Copping, son of George Copping and Elizabeth Saggers, married Mary Grey in Rawdon in 1830. Together they had ten children: John (b. 1831), Thomas (b. 1833), George (b. 1835), Elizabeth (b. 1837), Margaret (b. 1839), Mary E. (b. 1841), Ann (b. 1844), Charles (b. 1846), Sarah (b. 1848), and Jane (1851).

(Generation 3) John Copping, son of George W. Copping and Mary Grey, married Nancy Marlin in 1855 in Rawdon. Together they had three children: James Henry (b. 1857), Mary Jane, and John Alexander (b. 1868). John A. married Sarah Alice Mason in 1896 in Rawdon. The couple settled in Sand Hill after a short time in Comtpon until they moved to Lennoxville in 1945. They did not have any children. John died at the Sherbrooke Hospital in 1949. Alice died in 1960.

(Generation 3) Mary Ellen Copping, daughter of George W. Copping and Mary Grey, married Edward Mason in Rawdon in 1861. Together they had ten children: James Charles (b. 1862), Mary Ellen (b. 1864), Eliza Jane (b. 1865), George William (b. 1867), Annie Mariah (b. 1869), Sarah Alice (b. 1873), Charlotte Edith (b. 1877), Edward Armstrong (b. 1878), Thomas Albert (b. 1880), and Ethel Maude (b. 1882). Annie Mariah Mason married John Richard Copping. Mary Ellen Mason married Richard F. Boyce. Sarah Alice Mason married John Alex. Copping.

(Generation 3) Sarah Copping, daughter of George W. Copping and Mary Grey, married Samuel Dixon. She died in Cobden, Ontario in 1909.

(Generation 2) William G. Copping, son of Henry Copping and Elizabeth Saggers, married Margaret Gray in Rawdon in 1833. Together they had twelve children: Henry (b. 1834), William (1835-1836), George (b. 1838), Elizabeth (b. 1840), James (b. 1842), Thomas (b. 1844), William (b. 1845), John (b. 1847), Joseph (b. 1849), Charles (b. 1851), David (b. 1852), and Samuel (b. 1856). William died in 1889 in Rawdon. Among his children, George married Elizabeth Copping (daugther of Henry Copping and Jane Cook).

(Generation 2) Henry Copping, son of Henry Copping and Elizabeth Saggers, first married Jane Cook (ca. 1817-1846) in 1841 in Rawdon. Together they had three children: Mary (b. 1842), Elizabeth (b. 1844), and Jane (b. 1846). He married second Frances “Fannie” Harkness (1827-1872) in 1847 in Rawdon. Together they had eleven children: George (b. 1848), Ellen Maria (b. 1849), Jane L. (b. 1851), Sarah Ann (b. 1853), Henry (b. 1856), William Thomas (b. 1858), Margaret Frances (b. 1860), James Charles (b. 1862), John Richard (b. 1864), Clara Emiline (b. 1866), and Reuben (b. 1868). Henry Copping married third Mary Sinclair (ca. 1833-1887).

(Generation 3) Elizabeth Copping, daughter of Henry Copping and Jane Cook, married George Copping (son of Wiliam George Copping and Margaret Gray) in Montreal in 1870. Together they had six children: Helena, Clara Maude, Wiliam Henry Grey, Mary Alice, Melvin Francis, and Charles Clayton.

(Generation 3) Jane L. Copping, daughter of Henry Copping and Fannie/Frances Harkness, married John Johnston in Montreal 1874. Together they had five children: Violet, Victor, Augustus “Gus” Hyatt, Laura Sinclair, and John Walter.

(Generation 3) Sarah Ann “Lail” Copping, daughter of Henry Copping and Fannie/Frances Harkness, married James Barrow in Montreal in 1880. Together they had seven children: Lester, Hartley, Eleanor, Garnet, Grace, Hazel, and Douglas.

(Generation 3) John “Jack” Richard Copping, son of Henry Copping and Fannie/Frances Harkness, married Annie Mariah Mason in Montreal in 1893. Together they had one child: Vivian Iris.

(Generation 3) Reuben Copping, son of Henry Copping and Fannie/Frances Harkness, married Eliza Jane Mason in Montreal in 1894. Together they had three children: Laurence Edward, Reginald Lloyd, and Ruby Isabel. Reuben worked for a time in Montreal for Christie, Brown & Company, followed by the purchase of a farm in Sand Hill. He died in Sand Hill in 1929.

Copping (famiily)

  • C002
  • Family
  • fl. 1868-1960

John Alexander Copping (a.k.a. Jack) was born in Rawdon, Quebec in 1868, the son of John Copping and Nancy Marlin. Sarah Alice Mason was born in Rawdon, Quebec in 1873, the daughter of Edward Mason and Mary Copping. John and Alice, as she was known, were married in 1896. Shortly after their marriage, they moved from Rawdon to a farm in Compton Township. Between 1906-1908, they bought a farm at Sand Hill, in Eaton Township. They did not have any children. John died in 1949 and Alice died in 1960.

Annie Mariah Mason, Alice's sister, was born 7 December 1869, the daughter of Edward Mason and Mary Copping. She married John (Jack) Richard Copping in Montreal in 1893. Together, they had two children: Vivian and Rita. The couple lived in Montreal, and in Lennoxville for a brief time. After their separation, Annie returned to Montreal and the children when to live with an aunt and uncle. Annie died 4 December 1965.

Cooke, Clara May, 1886-1968

  • Person

One of Darius May and Emma Stevens' ten children, Clara May was born 14 February 1886 in Baldwin's Mills. She moved to Montreal and married Fred Cooke, a widower, in 1927. The couple never had any children. Clara died 11 July 1968 and is buried in Lakeview Cemetery in Baldwin's Mills.

Cook, Mary Jane

  • Person
  • 1849-1927

Mary Jane Bennett (Aug. 7, 1849 - June 9, 1927) of Brookbury, was the daughter of Edward Bennett and Hannah Rowe. She married John Cook Jr. (1848 to June 8th, 1895), who was the son of John Cook Sr. and Jane Lindsay. Mary Jane and John Cook Jr. were the grandparents of Gordon Joyce of Bishopton, Quebec.

Conner, Reginald, b. 1910

Dairy farmer and local historian Reginald Conner was born 6 March 1910 in Minton, Quebec. He attended Minton District School No. 4 from 1916 to 1922 and then North Hatley High School. He obtained a Diploma in Agriculture from Macdonald College in Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue in 1929 and then returned to Minton to farm. Conner retired from dairy farming in 1975 and spent many years doing research on local history and genealogy. In 1989 he published The Vine and the Branches. History of Minton, Quebec.

Compton United Church (Compton, Que.)

Compton United Church, initially of Methodist denomination, was organized in the middle of the nineteenth century as part of the Compton Circuit, which included Clifton, Martinville and Ives Hill. In 1925, when the United Church of Canada was founded, amalgamating the Methodist, Presbyterian and Congregational Churches, the Compton Methodist Church decided to join the Union. The church was closed in 1961. The church property was then sold to the French Baptist Church and later on in the 1960s the building was demolished. Compton United Church was under the jurisdiction of the Quebec and Sherbrooke of the Montreal and Ottawa Conference of the United Church of Canada. The Church was governed by the Official Board, the Board of Stewards and the Congregation.

Comité de bassin Massawippi-Tomifobia (Ayer's Cliff, Que.)

The Comité de bassin Massawippi-Tomifobia (CBMT) was organized in 1998 by the Massawippi Water Protection Inc. and was incorporated as a non-profit organization in 2002. It was established because the members of the Massawippi Water Protection Inc. felt that Lake Massawippi's water problems neccessitated corrective measures far upstream from the lake, which came to empass the entire watershed. Although formed by the Massawippi Water Protection Inc., the CBMT is an independent organisation directed by 15 members, 10 of whom are delegates from various agricultural, forestry, municipal, and commercial groups. The CBMT's mission has been outlined to sensitize people to the importance of the watershed as well as to their interventions to improve water quality and the environment by working with citizens, users of the area, municipalities, the MRCs, federal and provincial ministries and other organizations. Some of the activities that have been realised during their existence are the removal of logjams on the bed and along the shores of the Tomifobia river and the planting of shrubs and trees along the shorelines of the Tomifobia and Niger rivers. Their activities are funded, for a significant part, by donations and government grants.

The CBMT was officially dissolved on 6 May 2005.

Results 1471 to 1500 of 2027