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Memphremagog Conservation Inc. (Lake Memphremagog, Que.)

The Memphremagog Conservation Inc. (MCI) was founded in 1967 by Gordon G. Kohl, Peter Kohl, and Herbert Mitchell, partially as a reaction to the extensive growth of algae on the lake during the summer of 1967, which alarmed many who used the lake. Administered by a board of seventeen directors, MCI is a non-profit organization with the mission to conserve the environment and natural beauty of Lake Memphremagog and its watershed. It achieves these objectives through the donations of its members and cooperation with similar environmental organizations.

With the rapid growth of its membership to over 1000 members, MCI has led and participated in numerous lake protection projects over the years. Among these are a large campaign against a Calgary-based company with plans to establish a houseboat rental business on the lake as well as another protesting the contemplation of the U.S. government to construct a nuclear waste dump in Vermont, which would have been located in the Lake Memphremagog drainage basin. Both of these projects were successfully defeated with the help of action taken by the MCI. Today, the MCI continues to fulfill its mission with a variety of projects aimed at the further protection of Lake Memphremagog and the education of the residents of its shores.

Skinner, Albert Carlos, 1871-1964

Albert Carlos Skinner was born in Waterloo on 26 November 1871. He is the son of Carlos Young Skinner and Emily Elliot. He moved to Sherbrooke with his parents in 1878. He married Margaret Cowan in 1899. He was the father of five children (three sons and two daughters).

He was the President of the jewellery firm "A. C. Skinner Limited" in Sherbrooke until 1935, which was founded in Waterloo by his father in 1859. Albert C. Skinner began working with his father in 1898 and took over after his death in 1915. Albert C. Skinner's sons, Carlos C. and Neil, took over the company in 1935 and changed its name to "Skinners Brothers". In 1954, the company was sold to another jeweller of Sherbrooke, "Nadeau & fils".

In the 1920s and 1930s, Albert C. Skinner was involved in municipal politics. He was a member of the Sherbrooke City Council from 1917 to 1926, and the Mayor from 1930 to 1932. Throughout his political life, he fostered the "bonne entente" between the anglophones and the francophones of the city to build up a strong community.

He was a member of many organizations. He was a Mason and an Odd Fellow. At once, he had been the President of the Sherbrooke Board of Trade, Sherbrooke Library, Sherbrooke Rotary, and the Wales Home (Richmond). He also was a member of the Sherbrooke Snow Shoe Club, Sherbrooke Country Club, Sherbrooke Curling Club, St. George's Club, Canadian Club.

Albert C. Skinner died in August 1964 at 92 years old.

Short, Edward, 1806-1871

Edward Short was born in Bristol (England) on 10 June 1806. He is the son of John Quirk Short and the grandson of Reverend Robert Quirk Short, Anglican minister of Trois-Rivières. He married Ann Brown on 7 May 1839 in Sherbrooke. He was the father of seven children (two sons and five daughters). He was called to the bar on 12 October 1826 after studying law in turn in Trois-Rivières and Montreal. He settled in Sherbrooke in 1830 to practice law with Ebenezer Peck and later with his brother John Short. Before, he practised in Montreal, Trois-Rivières and Quebec city. In December 1851, he became Deputy of the town of Sherbrooke. He became Judge of the Superior Court of Lower Canada (District of St. Francis) on 12 November 1852, a function he occupied until is death. He also sat on the Seigneurial Court created in 1854. Edward Shord died in Sherbrooke on 5 June 1871.

Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Fidelity Rebekah Lodge, No. 33 (Ayer's Cliff, Que.)

The Fidelity Rebekah Lodge No. 33 was institued the 24 November 1915 for the town of Ayer's Cliff. Like other Rebekah Lodges, it was founded on the principles of 'Friendship, Love and Trust'. The Rebekah Lodges, while affiliated with the Odd Fellows, were designed especially for women, with the author of the Rebekah Ritual being American statesman Schuyler Colfax. The Sovereign Grand Lodge has jurisdiction over the entire fraternity. Within Quebec, all Rebekah Lodges are under the jurisdiction of the Rebekah Assembly of Quebec, which is divided in five Districts consisting of various number of lodges. Locally, the Lodge is under the leadership of a Noble Grand. Under the by-laws of the organization, the Rebekahs meet twice a month.

Lennoxville and District Women's Centre (Lennoxville, Que.)

The Lennoxville and District Women's Centre grew out of the need to have greater representation for English speaking women in the Eastern Townships. Local women wished to have "a permanent location where [English-speaking] women could meet on a regular basis to talk share ideas and hold activities". They researched other women's groups and queried the community on the status of women. Lennoxville and District Women's Centre local women met with the permission of the Eastern Township's Regional School Board at the Lennoxville Elementary School. They also met at the Lennoxville Town hall before a more permanent building was found.

In April 19th 1981 the Lennoxville and District Women's Centre was founded. The mission statement of this group stated that "[S]erving English speaking women throughout Region 05 ("Estrie"), we are a volunteer group dedicated to helping women develop their full potential. We encourage women to participate in their communities through education, political, and social activities. We accomplish this by offering a meeting place and resource centre for women, formal and informal education opportunities, a liaison between English-speaking women and existing services, and an information and referral service". In the same year a formal constitution was granted and the Centre's Board developed methods to achieve its feminist and community goals. The constitution was adopted in 1982 by the members at the first Annual General Meeting. In 1982 the Centre resided in an apartment at 109 Queen Street in Lennoxville. The organizational structure consists of members, an elected board and staff. The membership cost in 1981 was $5.00 and ten years later in 1991 it was $10.00. The Centre's Board of Directors of members meets monthly. The staff work in the Centre assisting in the office, resource library and with visitors.

Activities of the Lennoxville and District Women's Centre have been supported by Centraide Estrie canvassing and organization grants, as well as grants from provincial government ministries such as Ministry of Secretary of State and Centre de services sociaux de l'Estrie. In addition to this the Centre has participated in Travaux Communautaires and Summer Canada Works, employment programs for students and office help.

The Lennoxville and District Women's Centre hosts events to help educate, inform and support women in the community. They host events such as Centre drop ins, films series, writing workshops, dinners, memorials and car repair information nights. Members and visitors also use the Women's Centre for resources, information and aid. The Centre developed a resource library in 1982 and keeps statistics on usage of this information and the Centre by members and non-members. The Centre continues to gather information and support programs on issues from education to widow support. The Centre's representatives have participated in local and provincial workshops with other women's groups. They have written on women's issues and authored reports such as their report presented to the Special Committee on Pornography and Prostitution in Sherbrooke and a report titled "Women and The Home" both in 1984. The Centre has published a monthly newsletter from its creation and has supported several petition campaigns.

In 2006, the Centre is located at 257, Queen Street in Lennoxville.

Malvern Cemetery Company (Lennoxille, Que.)

The Malvern Cemetery Company owns and manages Malvern Cemetery situated on Moulton Hill Road in Lennoxville.

On the 3rd of November 1869, a public meeting was held at Lennoxville Town Hall with the purpose of discussing the prospects of establishing a public cemetery. At this meeting it was decided to establish a public protestant cemetery. Parcels of land - 8.5 acres - were purchased in 1870, 1871, and 1872. The cemetery was divided up into 4 blocks of 80 lots each and as decided at the first meeting each lot shall be large enough to contain 8 graves.

Scowen, Philip Harry, 1906-1989

Philip Harry Scowen was born in Ipswich England on September 13, 1906. In 1909, Philip's parents (Herbert H. and Cordelia) brought the family to Canada. In 1930 he married Eulah Annis Reed. They had three children, son Reed, daughter Lee (Campione) and son Philip. Mr. Scowen's first job was as a factory hand at the Brompton Pulp and Paper Company. Over the years he rose through the ranks to become the company's general manager. In the early sixties he left Brompton Pulp and Paper, to found his own company, Perkins Paper Products. From 1946 to 1967, Mr. Scowen served on the executive Committee for the corporation of Bishop's University. In 1961 the chancellor conferred the D.C.L. on him in recognition of his services to Bishop's. He had a love for the history of the Eastern Townships; he collected and donated to the library, a large number of books and historical documents on the Townships. Furthermore, he co-authored, with Charles de Volpi, a book on the history of the Eastern Townships, featuring many rare prints of the region. Philip Harry Scowen passed away in 1989.

Naylor, Margaret, 1905-1994

Margaret Naylor, née McKindsey, was born in Lennoxville in 1905. She studied at Bishop's University and McGill University where she earned a degree in Physical Education. She taught school very briefly in Montreal before her marriage to Reed Naylor in 1930. Her husband's job in the investment business took them to Jamaica during World War II. In 1944, they settled in Vancouver. Margaret Naylor died in 1994 and her ashes were interred in the Malvern Cemetery in Lennoxille in 2000.

Lennoxville Curling Club (Lennoxville, Que.)

The Lennoxville Curling Club was founded in April 1923, with an inaugural meeting at the Lennoxville Town Hall. At this meeting, Robert McMurray was elected as the club's first president. On 5 January 1924 the rink was ready, and the Club was officially opened; a crowd of 300 attended this opening. At the time, the Lennoxville Curling Association owned the rink and rented it to the Club until its dissolution in 1946. In the early years, curling began in January and ended in mid-March; later the season expanded from November to April.

In the first few years, only men's rinks competed in leagues. In 1931, ladies began to participate in their own league when the Ladies's curling club was formed on 11 December 1931. Seniors members also have their league and participate in most competitions. Since its founding, the Lennoxville Curling Club, with its many committees, has been very active organizing leagues and annual bonspiels such as the Mixed Invitational, Men's Invitational, Downs Trophy Bonspiel, President's - Vice-president's competition, Spring Fling, and others. It has also hosted national and provincial championships and has participated to out of town bonspiels.

Throughout its history, the club has served the community not only as a venue of healthy recreation and competition, but equally as a place for socialization and leisure.

Sherbrooke Hospital Ladies' Auxiliary (Sherbrooke, Que.)

The Sherbrooke Hospital Ladies' Auxiliary (SHLA) began their activities on September 20th, 1894, well before the official opening of the Sherbrooke Hospital. Their main objective was to foster, assist, promote, encourage, maintain, and contribute to worthy projects in the hospital. The SHLA had to fundraise to support their activities. Some of their fundraising activities were the Sherbrooke Fair, Annual Tea or Bridge, Jam Shower, Annual Dance (formerly named Linen Ball) and the House and Garden Tour. To operate, the SHLA had both active and associate members, officers and an executive committee. The SHLA is divided into several subcommittees. The Hospitality Shop opened in 1951 and became a main source of revenue. The Baby Birthday Club was introduced the same year to improve the Maternity Ward. The In Memoriam Fund, which commenced during the 1950s, contributed to special needs of the Hospital. The Scholarship and Bursary Fund encouraged and assisted the undergraduate nurses financially and organized activities for them. The SHLA also had two affiliated groups: the Lennoxville Wing and the Carry-On-Club.

Mackey, Leeman

  • M014
  • Person
  • 1883-1966

Leeman Mackey (baptized with family name of Mackay) was born on 3 October 1883 to William Mackay and Jemima Rice in Weedon, Quebec. By 1911, Leeman had moved to Marbleton and appears to have been an apprentice under Alvin Barter, a butcher. Leeman Mackey was butcher in Marbleton. He took over Alvin Barter’s butcher business around 1916 and was the first butcher to go from village to village with a cart. Leeman married Dora Mackay in 1912 and together they had one child, Lloyd Allen, born in 1913. They also had a daughter, Una, who died in 1920. He died on 27 September 1966 and is buried at the Lakeside Cemetery in Bishopton.

Sentiers Massawippi (Massawippi, Que.)

The Sentiers Massawippi Trail is a non profit organization founded in 1990. The mandate of the organization is to preserve and protect the natural environment, to minimise the impact on the environment by human activity, and to provide a safe and secure place for fresh-air activity. To fulfil their mandate the Sentiers Massawippi promote the creation of a multi use linear greenspace corridor, known as a "Greenway", along abandoned railroad lines. In 1989, the Canadian Pacific Railway abandoned roughly fifty kilometres of track from Beebe junction to Sherbrooke. This provided an ideal opportunity for the creation of a nature trail to be built along the abandoned rail bed. Immediately, the Sentiers Massawippi took steps to acquire the abandoned land from the province, railway company and the municipalities along the trail. This trail is intended to serve the communities as a place for a variety of healthy outdoor activities such as, cycling, hiking, skiing, etc. In 1991, through the lobbying efforts of the Sentiers Massawippi, the first section of the trail, from Lennoxville to North Hatley (13km) was acquired by the town of Lennoxville and tansformed into a greenway. The second section of the trail, from North Hatley to Ayer's Cliff (12km) was sold to local proprietors. In 1993, the land for the third section, Ayer's cliff to Beebe (19km) were transferred to the Sentiers Massawippi, in the goal of creating "Le Sentier Naturel Tomifobia".

Estrie Young Singers (Lennoxville, Que.)

Estrie Young Singers is an auditioned choir for children founded in 1987 by Nancy Rahn and a group of volunteer parents. It was incorporated in 1990 as a non-profit organization having its head office in Lennoxville. The choir's French name is "Les jeunes chanteurs de l'Estrie". Its mandate is to provide solid musical and singing training to children aged 8 to 16 years old. The choir gives concerts, performs for organizations and churches throughout the Townships, and participates in regional events. The choir is directed by a Parents' Committee including, as ex officio members, the choir director and the accompanist. The Parents' Committee is responsible for administrative and financial matters and the choir director for all musical decisions. Financial resources available come from fees, fund-raising activities, and private donations. Nancy Rahn was Choir Director was from 1987 to 1998 and Annette Ýien from 1998 to 1999; accompanists have been Cheryl Stroud, Gloria Scott, and Sarah Heath. The Estrie Young Singers suspended its activities in 1999.

Martin (family)

This is the fonds of the Martin family of Stukeley Township, Shefford county, Quebec. Benjamin Mason Martin was born in 1823 and died in 1897. He married Abigail Sargeant (1825-1894) on December 31, 1851. Benjamin was a farmer, owning land near Frost Village. The Martin family was active in the community, participating in, among other things, the temperance movement, and municipal affairs.

Boomhour, Harold, 1898-1986

Harold Boomhour was born in 1898 in Clarenceville, Quebec. He attended Wesleyan College in Montreal and he was a student minister in Abbotsford from 1921 to 1924. He was ordained as a minister of the Methodist Church in 1924. The same year, Rev. Boomhour married Mildred Gillespie in Abbotsford. In 1925, he automatically became minister of the United Church of Canada, when the Methodist, Presbyterian, and Congregational churches amalgamated. He served in the following pastoral charges: Diamond, Ont. (1924-1925); Hatley's Station, Ont. (1925-1927); Pontypool, Ont. (1927-1930); Pittsburgh Township, Ont. (1930-1933); Westport, Ont. (1933-1936); Rednersville, Ont. (1936-1941); Manilla, Ont. (1941-1942); Caughnawaga, Que. (1942-1946); Dunham, Que. (1946-1949); Ayers' Cliff, Que. (1949-1957); Waterloo, Que. (1957-1964); and Lacolle, Que. (1964-1968). Rev. Boomhour served also as chairman of the Quebec-Sherbrooke Presbytery and its Pastoral Relations Committee (1959-1960), and as secretary of the Montreal-Ottawa Conference Settlement Committee for three years. Rev. Boomhour retired from the ministry in 1968 and died in Morrisburg, Ont., in 1986.

Gray, Pope

Captain Pope Gray and his wife, Mary Elizabeth Berkley Gray lived in Ballinlough (Ireland) with their children. On the evening of Tuesday, 15 June 1869, their house was attacked by Fenians. During the attack, Captain Pope Gray mortally shot Andrew Campbell, one of the fenians. An inquest followed the event with a verdict of justifiable homicide for Captain Pope Gray.

Hatley Centre Women's Institute (Hatley, Que.)

The Hatley Women's Institute was organized in 1955. As with other Women's Institutes, whose motto is 'For Home and Country', this one was concerned with family in rural regions. The Hatley Centre Women's Institute is a member of the Stanstead County Women's Institutes, the Quebec Women's Institutes, and the Federated Women's Institutes of Canada. Delegates attend the annual meetings of these organizations. Locally, an elected board of directors worked with various committees (Agriculture, Education, Home Economics, National and International Relations, Publicity, Sunshine, Welfare and Health etc.) to organize monthly meetings and activities. The latter included lectures, school fairs, and fund raising events (bake sales, rummage sales, paper drives, plant sales, card parties, etc.) in support of the Canadian Red Cross Society, local schools and hospitals, and other worthy causes. As of 2002, the Hatley Centre Women's institute is still functioning.

North Hatley Women's Institute (North Hatley, Que.)

The North Hatley Women's Institute was founded in 1919. Until 1920, it was called the North Hatley Homemakers' Club. Like the other Women's Institutes, whose motto is 'For Home and Country', this one was concerned with family in rural regions. The North Hatley Women's Institute was a member of the Stanstead County Women's Institutes, the Quebec Women's Institutes, and the Federated Women's Institutes of Canada. Delegates attended the annual meetings of these organizations. Locally, an elected board of directors worked with various committees (Agriculture, Education, Home Economics, National and International Relations, Publicity, Sunshine, Welfare and Health etc.) to organize monthly meetings and activities. The latter included lectures, school fairs, and fund raising events (bake sales, rummage sales, paper drives, plant sales, card parties, etc.) in support of the Canadian Red Cross Society, local schools and hospitals, and other worthy causes. In 1968, due to low membership, and the close proximity of the Hatley Centre Women's Institute, the North Hatley Women's Institute voted to disband. The Hatley Centre Women's institute offered invitations to the members of the North Hatley Women's Institute to associate themselves with the Hatley Centre branch.

Massawippi Women's Institute (Massawippi, Que.)

The Massawippi Women's Institute was founded in 1919. Until 1920, it was called the Massawippi Homemakers' Club. Like the other Women's Institutes, whose motto is 'For Home and Country', this one was concerned with family in rural regions. The Massawippi Women's Institute was a member of the Stanstead County Women's Institutes. Due to waning interest, the Massawippi Women's Institute was apparently disbanded sometime during 1923.

Stanstead County Women's Institutes (Stanstead, Que.)

The Stanstead County Homemaker's Club was organized in 1915 to group together all the Homemaker's Clubs of Stanstead County. This county-level club was intended to allow the various clubs in the county to support one another. Three clubs joined in 1915, they were the clubs from Smith's Mills (later known as Tomifobia), Way's Mills, and Ayer's Cliff. In 1920, the Homemaker's clubs decided that it would be more appropriate to call themselves "Women's Institutes", as it would allow them more latitude for their activities. As with the provincial association of Women's Institutes, they encourage the development of agriculture, the raising of homemaking standards, the preservation of national handicrafts traditions, the production and use of Canadian-made goods, the promotion of education, the development of a true spirit of patriotism and of international unity, the promotion of the welfare of the child, and the dissemination of information on Women's Institutes. The Stanstead County Women's Institutes is a member of the Quebec Women's Institutes and the Federated Women's Institutes of Canada. Its board consists of elected officers and convenors and presidents of the various area Women's Institutes. It is responsible for stimulating the activities and work of its member Institutes and for holding two conventions a year for their members. Over the years several Women's Institutes would be formed in the County, and would subsequently join the County Institute. They were: The Massawippi Women's Institute (1919), the North Hatley Women's Institute (1919), the Beebe Women's Institute (1920), the Hatley Women's Institute (1921), the North Stanstead Women's Institute (1928), the Dixville Women's Institute (1934), the Minton Women's Institute (1937), and Hatley Centre Women's Institute (1955).

Friedman (family)

The Friedman family fonds relates to two family members in particular: Malca Hilda Friedman (born May 7th, 1896) and Ruby Doris Friedman (born July 17th, 1900). Their parents, Julius and Hattie Friedman, were born in Latvia but came to Canada when they were young. They met in Sherbrooke and were married in Montreal in 1891. The Jewish family first lived in Sherbrooke, where the three sisters, Malca, Ray and Ruby, were born. They moved to Montreal in the early 1900s. All three sisters attended Aberdeen School and Shaar Hashomayim Sunday School. Malca first worked at the Baron de Hirsch Institute from 1917 to 1921, then accepted a scholarship to study social work at McGill University while working as field worker for the Family Welfare Department. Malca also took a course in writing for publication at Columbia University, New York. She held office in the Montreal Social Workers' Club and afterwards in the Montreal Branch of the Canadian Authors' Association. She was awarded the King George medal in 1935. She resigned of the Family Welfare Department in 1937, after 20 years of service. Ruby studied in the Commercial and Technical High School, where she specialised in commercial subjects. She worked for 58 years as secretary and accountant for the Jewish Colonization Association. Ruby died on March 18th, 1985. Malca and Ruby both did a lot of writing through the years and were published in different journals, anthologies and periodicals in Canada and the United States. They wrote poetry, articles and short stories. Ruby also wrote children's literature (stories and poems).

Gilbart, Jean Tansley, 1916-1997

Jean Tansley Gilbart was born on 12 November 1916 in Dauphin, Manitoba. She worked as laboratory technician before joining the Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps in 1942. She served in Canada and in the United Kingdom. She died in Victoria, British Columbia on 10 October 1997.

North Hatley Unitarian Universalist Church (North Hatley, Que.)

The North Hatley Unitarian Universalist Church was incorporated in 1886 under the name First Universalist Church of North Hatley. However, the first church was built only in 1895. The church was served by the minister of the Huntingville Universalist Church until a full-time minister was employed. Since 1953, the services are held only in the summer and on special occasions. The Church members are from different places in the Eastern Townships: North Hatley, Sherbrooke, Lennoxville, Rock Forest, Magog, Knowlton, etc. The Church was affiliated with the Vermont and Quebec Universalist Unitarian Convention until the reorganization of the Convention in the 1960s to form the New Hampshire Vermont District of Unitarian Universalist Societies. The Church is managed by a board of directors, different organizations and committees such as the Sunday School and the Women's Alliance. The North Hatley Unitarian Universalist Church is the only active Universalist church in Quebec.

Boy Scouts of Canada. 1st Windsor Group (Windsor, Que.)

The 1st Windsor Group was organized in 1929, it succeeded a Windsor group from 1915 to 1927. At its foundation, the 1st Windsor Group was part of the Eastern Townships District; it was later integrated to the St. Francis Valley District. The 1st Windsor Group was under the responsibility of a Group Committee formed of 5 or more adults, plus the Scouter of the Group. The Group ceased its activities in 1970 and transferred its bank balance to the District in 1973.

Epps, Bernard, 1936-2007

Bernard Epps was born in Whitstable, Kent county, England in 1936. In 1950, his family immigrated to Ohio. In 1953, he graduated from High School and began work as a draftsman in Columbus, to make money to fund his education at the School of Visual Arts in New York City. After four years of alternating between school and work, he voyaged with some friends to California, where he worked as a draftsman, designing ceramic microchips and working for (among other places) Litton industries. In 1965, he married Susan Dreger. In 1966, he purchased his father's farm in Gould Station, Quebec in order to devote his time to farming and writing. In 1967, his only child, Jennifer, was born. In the early to mid 1960s, he began his writing career, publishing several short stories, and it was in 1967, that he would publish his first novel, Pilgarlic the Death. In 1973, he published the immensely popular The Outlaw of Megantic. In the 1980s, he joined Charles Bury in running the Townships Sun, a newspaper devoted to representing the Eastern Townships Anglophone community. He continued to contribute to the paper late into life, writing mostly on the subjects of Townships' history and culture. In addition to his contributions to the Townships Sun, he also contributed significantly to the Sherbrooke Record, and in other newspapers and journals. Mr. Epps also spent some time as a teacher with adult extension programmes at Lennoxville's Champlain Regional college, and the Eastern Townships School board, teaching such subjects as creative writing and local history. In 1995, Mr. Epps moved to Lennoxville. Other notable publications on Mr. Epps' resume include: Tales of the Townships(1980)., The Royal Rifles of Canada in Hong Kong, 1941-1954 (1981)- editor., More Tales of the Townships (1985)., Second Blessing: a centennial history of the Sherbrooke Hospital, 1888-1988. (1988) - published in both French and English, The Eastern Townships Adventure (1992)., Please sir, I'd Rather be Ravished: selected rhymes and reasons (2000).

Bernard Epps passed away on 5 July 2007 in Kingston, Ontario at the age of 71.

Cherry River Women's Institute (Cherry River, Que.)

The Cherry River Women's Institute was founded in 1934. Like the other Women's Institutes of Canada, whose motto is 'For Home and Country', this one was concerned with family life in rural regions. The Cherry River Women's Institute was a member of the Sherbrooke County Women's Institutes, the Quebec Women's Institutes, and the Federated Women's Institutes of Canada. Delegates attended the annual meetings of these organizations. As well, the Cherry River Women's Institute organized activities jointly with Macdonald College in Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue. Locally, the elected board worked with various committees (Agriculture Home Economics, Education, Citizenship, Welfare and Health, Publicity, Sunshine Communications, International Affairs, Ways and Means) to organize monthly meetings and activities. The latter included lectures; horticultural contests; school fairs; and fund-raising events (sales of cookies, card parties, rummage sales and draws) in aid of the Canadian Red Cross Society, the Canadian Cancer Society, and other humanitarian organizations. The Cherry River Women's Institute was disbanded in 1955.

Orford Women's Institute (Orford, Que.)

The Orford Women's Institute was founded in 1917. It was first called the Orford Homemaker's Club like the other Women's Institutes of Canada, their motto was 'For Home and Country'. The Orford Women's Institute was concerned with family life in rural regions. The Orford Women's Institute was a member of the Sherbrooke County Women's Institutes, the Quebec Women's Institutes, and the Federated Women's Institutes of Canada. Delegates attended the annual meetings of these organizations. As well, the Orford Women's Institute organized activities jointly with Macdonald College in Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue. Locally, the elected board worked with various committees (Agriculture, Home Economics, Education, Citizenship, Welfare and Health, Publicity, Sunshine Communications, International Affairs, Ways and Means) to organize monthly meetings and activities. The latter included lectures; horticultural contests; school fairs; and fund-raising events (sales of cookies, card parties, rummage sales and draws) in aid of the Canadian Red Cross Society, the Canadian Cancer Society, and other humanitarian organizations. The Orford Women's Institute was disbanded in 1955.

Beebe Women's Institute (Beebe, Que.)

The Beebe Women's Institute was founded in 1921. Like the other Women's Institutes, whose motto is 'For Home and Country', this one was concerned with family in rural regions. The Beebe Women's Institute was a member of the Stanstead County Women's Institutes, the Quebec Women's Institutes, and the Federated Women's Institutes of Canada. Delegates attended the annual meetings of these organizations. Locally, an elected board of directors worked with various committees (Agriculture, Child Welfare, Education, Home Economics, Immigration, Social Service, etc.) to organize monthly meetings and activities. The latter included lectures, school fairs, and fund raising events (food sales, card parties, various contests, etc.) in support of the Children's Memorial Hospital, the Salvation Army, local schools and hospitals, and other worthy causes. After 66 years of activity, the Beebe Women's Institute was disbanded in 1964.

Minton Women's Institute (Minton, Que.)

The Minton Mills Women's Institute was founded in 1937. Like the other Women's Institutes, whose motto is 'For Home and Country', this one was concerned with family in rural regions. The Minton Women's Institute was a member of the Stanstead County Women's Institutes, the Quebec Women's Institutes, and the Federated Women's Institutes of Canada. Delegates attended the annual meetings of these organizations. Locally, an elected board of directors worked with various committees (Agriculture, Education, Home Economics, National and International Relations, Publicity, Sunshine, Welfare and Health etc.) to organize monthly meetings and activities. The latter included lectures, school fairs, and fund raising events (bake sales, rummage sales, paper drives, plant sales, card parties, etc.) in support of the Canadian Red Cross Society, local schools and hospitals, and other worthy causes. In 1941, the Minton Women's Institute help found a Boys' and Girls' Club. In 1964, the Minton Women's Institute thought of disbanding, but the records give the impression that it did not at that time.

Way's Mills Women's Institute (Way's Mills, Que.)

The Way's Mills Women's Institute was founded in 1914 as a Homemakers' Club. As the other Homemakers' Club changed to Women's Institutes in the early 1920s, so too did the Way's Mills club. Like the other Women's Institutes, whose motto is 'For Home and Country', this one was concerned with family in rural regions. The Way's Mills Women's Institute was a member of the Stanstead County Women's Institutes, the Quebec Women's Institutes, and the Federated Women's Institutes of Canada. Delegates attended the annual meetings of these organizations. Locally, an elected board of directors worked with various committees (Agriculture, Citizenship, Education, Home Economics, Publicity, Welfare and Health, etc.) to organize monthly meetings and activities. The latter included lectures, school fairs, and fund raising events (cookbooks, craft sales, paper drives, etc.) in aid of the Children's Memorial Hospital, the Save the Children Fund, and local schools and hospitals. After 50 years of activity, the Way's Mills Women's Institute was disbanded in 1968.

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