Showing 545 results

Authority record
Person

Yearwood, Peter J.

  • Person

Professor and historian, Peter J. Yearwood was born in London, England on May 8, 1948. After graduating from Bishop's University in 1968, he went to Balliol College, Oxford, where he got a second BA in 1970 (which more or less automatically became an MA a few years later) and then went to the University Of Sussex, where he studied under Christopher Thorne, and eventually gained a PhD in History in 1980. After several years in part-time adult education in London, in 1979 he took up a post in the Department of History at the University of Jos in Nigeria, where he reached the level of Senior Lecturer. In 1996 he returned to England to seek employment and push on with writing a book. In 2000, he took up a post as Visiting Senior Lecturer at the University of Papua New Guinea. He has several publications on British policy in the era of the First World War, on imperial rivalries in Africa, and on the expatriate firms and the Nigerian colonial economy in World War I. He has also worked with colleagues in Jos to develop the historiography of the Central Nigerian area. Author of Nigeria and the Death of Liberal England Palm Nuts and Prime Ministers, 1914-1916. Author note reads: Peter J. Yearwood is Leader of the History, Gender Studies, and Philosophy Strand at the University of Papua New Guinea, and Joint Editor of the South Pacific Journal of Philosophy and Culture. He is the author of Guarantee of Peace, The League of Nations in British Politics 1914-1925 (2009).

Frizzell, Harold C.

  • Canada
  • Person
  • 1921-2010

Harold C. Frizzell was born on December 20, 1921. While attending the local high school he served on the Students’ Council, played hockey and basketball and was among the school’s skiers. He returns in the third year to continue a B.Sc. course majoring in Chemistry and Physics. He received a B.Sc. from Bishop's University in 1946 married Margaret C. H___ (1922-2007). He served in the Canadian Artillery during WWII and while at Bishop’s volunteered to farm out west. He was grandfather of Raymond Frizzell ’10. (Bishop's Magazine 2011). Harold C. Frizzell died on October 27, 2010.

Borlase, George

  • Person

George Borlase graduated from Bishop's University in 1855. According to the Barreau de Quebec he was on the Role of Order until 1880. The Sherbrooke Weekly Examiner and L'Electeur indicate that he committed suicide in August 8, 1883. He left behind a wife and seven children.

Duval, Raymond Errol

  • Person
  • 1920-2007

Raymond Errol Duval was the founder of the department of Business Administration at Bishop's University, and taught there from 1958-1983. Duval was born in Grand’Mere, Quebec on December 20, 1920. He first came to Bishop’s University as a student in 1939 and took part in all the available sporting activities, playing in each with “the same fiery enthusiasm, that determined desire to win.” He also acted in plays, was editor of The Mitre, and graduated with History Honors in 1942. Immediately after graduation, Errol obtained a commission in the Canadian Army, but his military career was cut short. He was invalided back to Canada from England in 1943. During his convalescence in London, Ontario, he met and married his wife Evelyn in 1949; their twins Greg and Catherine were born in 1951. After regaining his health, Errol entered graduate studies at the University of Western Ontario where he obtained a Diploma in Business Administration in 1951 and an M.B.A. in 1954. He taught Business Administration at Western and at the University of Windsor before he was invited to Bishop’s in 1958 to introduce a Business program. In the early 1960s, a two-member department, just Errol and an accounting professor, managed to offer a Business major for a B.A. degree. Despite these limited resources the program was a great success. Business alumni from that period, including David Williams after whom the Business School is now named, value the education they received. On arrival at Bishop’s, Errol also started an evening course in Executive Development that was extremely successful. Some 450 executives completed the course up to 1968 when it merged with a program given by the Canadian Institute of Management. Errol was also keen that the department should always have the best advice available, and ensured this by establishing an Advisory Committee of distinguished business people. By the time Errol retired, the Department had grown into a Division with twenty faculty and about one hundred graduates per year. Errol made many contributions to the administrative operations of the University and to the local community as a lay reader at local churches and as an enthusiastic member of Lennoxville Curling Club and Milby Golf Club, of which he was a founding member in 1964. The University recognized Errol’s outstanding contributions by the award of a D.C.L. at his retirement in 1983. He went to live in Jersey with his second wife Clare, who came from that island. Errol Duval, Professor Emeritus of Business, died on May 17, 2007.

Douglas, Cedric Stuart

  • Person
  • 1890-1968

Cedric Stuart Douglas wa born on 16 December 1890 in East Farnham, Quebec. He was the son of William James and Susan (Pearson) Douglas. He received his BA in 1914 from McGill University, then qualified as a teacher and French specialist and taught in Sutton. In 1916-1917, he was principal at Danville Academy where Marjorie Todd Bridgette was a teacher. In December 1917, he passed an army medical examination, reporting for duty at the end of the school year in July 1918. Attestation Papers induct #2522776 Gunner Cedric S. Douglas in to the 79th Battery Canadian Field Artillery (C.F.A). His battalion, by now the Second Canadian Tank Battalion, sailed from Quebec City on 5 October 1918. En route the Spanish Flu broke out and on arrival in English, everyone was hospitalized until after the Armistice. In England, waiting to be sent home, Cedric was made a Sergeant and taught at Khaki College.

Cedric eventually returned from England and was discharged on 30 July 1919. He had already secured the position of Principal at Cowansville Academy, and promptly wrote to Miss Bridgette, arranged to visit Birchton and in October proposed. Cedric and Marjorie Todd Bridgette were married 3 July 1920. Together they had two children: John Creighton and Robert Keith.

During the 1930s Great Depression, Cedric was Principal at several schools in different parts of the Province, but when Creighton entered McGill, he found a teaching position at Westmount High School in Montreal. At home in Sutton, he ran a small printing business, and after retirement, taught at St. Helen's School in Dunham. Cedric died in Sutton, Quebec on 26 June 1968.

Winn, Susan Anglin

  • Person

Susan Anglin Winn graduated from Bishop's University in 1961, and later received a M.Ed. from McGill University. In 1996 she retired from the Lester B. Pearson School Board after 32 years as a teacher, consultant and school administrator.

Whalley, George

  • Person
  • 1915-1983

George Whalley (25 July 1915 - 27 May 1983) was a scholar, poet, naval officer and secret intelligence agent during World War II, CBC broadcaster, musician, biographer, and translator.He taught English at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario (1950-80) and was twice the head of the department. He was elected to the Royal Society of Canada in 1959. He married Elizabeth Watts on July 25, 1944. His brother, Peter Whalley, was a famous artist and cartoonist. Whalley completed his first B.A. at Bishop's University, in Lennoxville, Quebec, graduating in 1935. As a Rhodes Scholar, he completed his second B.A. at Oriel College, Oxford, in 1939. He received an M.A. from Oriel College, Oxford, in 1945. He completed his second M.A. degree at Bishop's University in 1948. His thesis was entitled "A Critique of Criticism." He received his Ph.D. from King's College, University of London, in 1950. Whalley was a leading expert on the writings of the poet and critic Samuel Taylor Coleridge. Whalley served in the Royal Canadian Naval Volunteer Reserve (1940-56) and was on active duty in the
Royal Navy (1940-45). After the war, Whalley served as the Commander to HMCS Cataraqui in Kingston (1952-56). He retired with the rank of Commander in 1956. Whalley's wartime poetry has been praised as displaying a mature range and scope unique amongst second world war poets. George Whalley died in Kingston, Ontario in 1983.

Marie-Aimée Warrot

  • Person
  • 1915-1971

Marie Aimeé Warrot was born in France on the 18th of February 1915. She gave her first piano recital at the age of seven. From the age of nine she attended the Conservatoire National de Musique in Paris, until the age of fifteen when she was awarded the first prize in piano. She worked with Robert Casadesus and Alfred Cortot, and also studied in Vienna, Austria with the great pianist Emil von Sauer, who had been a student of Franz Liszt and Nicholas Rubinstein. Marie Aimée Warrot's musical tour of Europe was interrupted by World War II, and recommenced in 1944, encompassing North America in 1955. She gave recitals for television and radio, and appeared with many of the great European orchestras playing all over Europe. In 1969 Marie Aimée Warrot came to live in the Eastern Townships with her husband Bishop's University Professor Claude Treil. Marie Aimée Warrot made two critically
acclaimed musical recordings, the first in 1970 and the second in 1971. In March of 1971 she gave a last recital in Centennial Theatre at Bishop's University. She died in September of 1971.

Walker, Beulah

  • Person

Beulah Lilian Marlin Walker graduated from Bishop's University in 1938 with a High School Diploma' and her sister Millicent Marlin graduated in the same year. In 1942 Beulah Marlin married Frederick Walker. She was a teacher at Granby High School, 1939-1941; Assistant Principal at the Brownsburg Intermediate School, 1941-1942; and later office clerk Superheater Company, Sherbrooke.

Tondino, Guido

  • Person

Guido Tondino taught Drama at Bishop's University, Lennoxville, Quebec from 1979-1983. He is one of the country's top designers, having worked professionally since graduating from the National Theatre School of Canada/NTS. He also studied at Tulane University. For Centaur Theatre , with whom he has had a long relationship, he designed the premieres of Vittorio Rossi's The Chain and Paradise by the River; David Fennario's Moving; Kit Brennan's Having (1999); as well as Tennessee Williams' The Glass Menagerie, David French's Salt-Water Moon, and Paul Ledoux and David Young's Fire. He has also designed for the Saidye Bronfman Centre (Cold Storage), Neptune Theatre (Les Canadiens) and Tarragon Theatre (Something Red).
From 1986-91 he was the associate director and resident designer for Theatre Calgary where he designed, among other works, Hamlet and Waiting for Godot. He has worked extensively at the Stratford Festival, drawing critical raves in 1997 for his design for the company's Death of a Salesman. For the company he also designed Much Ado About Nothing, The Night of the Iguana, Filumena and The Little Foxes (among others). He designed productions of Present Laughter (Soulpepper Theatre Company 2001); Lenin's Embalmers by Vern Thiessen (Winnipeg Jewish Theatre and Harold Green Jewish Theatre 2010); La Peau d'Elisa by Carole Fréchette (2011), L'Homme du hasard, Grace & Gloria by Tom Ziegler (trans Michel Tremblay (2011), and Porc-épic by David Paquet (2012) at UniThéâtre. He has also designed in the United States, where he lived from 1980 to 1986, for the Abbey Theatre in Dublin, and the National Theatre of Romania. From 1998 to 2002, he was the director of design at the National Theatre School of Canada. He is currently in the faculty of the University of Alberta Drama Department.

Untitled

  • Person

One of the country's top designers, he has been working professionally since graduating from the National Theatre School of Canada/NTS. He also studied at Tulane University.

For Centaur Theatre - with whom he has had a long relationship - he designed the premieres of Vittorio Rossi's The Chain and Paradise by the River; David Fennario's Moving; Kit Brennan's Having (1999); as well as Tennessee Williams' The Glass Menagerie, David French's Salt-Water Moon, and Paul Ledoux and David Young's Fire.

He has also designed for the Saidye Bronfman Centre (Cold Storage), Neptune Theatre (Les Canadiens) and Tarragon Theatre (Something Red).

He taught Drama at Bishop's University, Lennoxville, Quebec from 1979 to 1983.

From 1986-91 he was the associate director and resident designer for Theatre Calgary where he designed, among other works, Hamlet and Waiting for Godot. He has worked extensively at the Stratford Festival, drawing critical raves in 1997 for his design for the company's Death of a Salesman. For the company he also designed Much Ado About Nothing, The Night of the Iguana, Filumena and The Little Foxes (among others).

More recently, he designed productions of Present Laughter (Soulpepper Theatre Company 2001); Lenin's Embalmers by Vern Thiessen (Winnipeg Jewish Theatre and Harold Green Jewish Theatre 2010); La Peau d'Elisa by Carole Fréchette (2011), L'Homme du hasard, Grace & Gloria by Tom Ziegler (trans Michel Tremblay (2011), and Porc-épic by David Paquet (2012) at UniThéâtre. He has also designed in the United States, where he lived from 1980 to 1986, for the Abbey Theatre in Dublin, and the National Theatre of Romania.

From 1998 to 2002, he was the director of design at the National Theatre School of Canada. He is now in the faculty of the University of Alberta Drama Department.

Sweeny, James

  • Person

James Sweeny received a B.A. from Concordia University in 1975, and an M.A. from Bishop's University in 1994. The subject of his thesis being A History of the Faculty of Divinity, Bishop's University, 1843-1971. He is also the author of Our saints and our stories : a history of the churches in the Greater Parish of St. Francis of Assisi (1996) and A short history of the Diocese of Quebec 1793-1993 (1993). For many years he was the editor of the Quebec Diocesan Gazette. He also worked at Bishop's University Library and served as the Diocesan Archivist for the Diocese of Quebec. He retired in 2019.

Stevens, Trevor C.

  • Person

Trevor C. Stevens attended Bishop's University in 1935-36, and his twin brother, Basil Webster Stevens, graduated in from Bishop's in 1936. His granddaughter, Martha MacLaurin, graduated also from Bishop's in 1994. The donor of these records, Charlotte Stevens MacLaurin, is his daughter. Her aunt and mother also attended Bishop's 1935-1938.

Smith, Kenneth W.

  • Person

Kenneth W. Smith graduated from Bishop's University with a B.A. in 1935.

H. Greville Smith

  • Person
  • 1902-1974

Harold Greville Smith was born in Sheffield on 25th January 1902 and attended the King Edward VII School there. In 1924 Smith went to work for ICI at Billingham, where he was mainly concerned with the methanol plant. In 1929 he was posted to the New York office of ICI.Smith moved to Montreal in 1932 as Manager of the Chemicals Development Department of Canadian Industries Ltd (CIL). On the outbreak of war he was named Vice-President and, a little later, General Manager of Defence Industries Ltd (DIL), a wartime government-owned subsidiary of CIL. For his prodigious managerial skills directly affecting the wartime effort, Smith was made a CBE in 1944. Throughout the war he had also been a Director of the
parent CIL, and he remained on the Board until 1958. He was President of the Company 1951-58. In his 1ast year at CIL he was also President of the Society of Chemical Industry. He served as Director of a score of companies, Governor of Bishop's University, Governor of McGill University, and President of the Royal Victoria Hospital Montreal. A bachelor, whose principal private interests were fishing and his collection of Canadian paintings, his life was by all accounts dedicated to hard work. He died in Montreal after a short illness on 19 February 1974. His estate was valued at over $4,000,000; the main beneficiaries were Balliol College, McGill University, The Royal Victoria Hospital Montreal, Bishop's University and Queen's University (Kingston, Ontario).

Eardley-Wilmot, Barbara Rose

  • Person
  • 1915-2002

Barbara Rose Eardley-Wilmot was born June 30, 1915 to parents Rev. Canon Charles Revell Eardley-Wilmot and Rose Meredyth Bowen. She married John “Jack” Franklin Carr August 1, 1942, but he died October 26, 1942 on active duty with the Royal Canadian Air Force in World War II. During the war, Barbara served as a nursing sister. She remarried Geoffrey Constable on October 11, 1947 and together they had four children: Catherine Judith (b. 1950), Janet Meredyth (b. 1953), Susan Emily (b. 1956), and Peter Geoffrey (b. 1960). She died in 2002.

Nicholson, Christan (1948--)

  • 2004_007
  • Person
  • 1948-

Mr. Christan Nicholson is a portrait artist who was born in 1948 in New Brunswick, Canada. He graduated from Mount Allison University with a B.F.A. with Distinction in 1973. His first official commission was the portrait of Chancellor J. V. Clyne for the University of British Columbia. He is known for his Canadian Author series--portraits for 32 well known Canadian Authors such as Hugh MacLennan and Margaret Atwood. He lives and continues to paint in Ottawa Ontario.

Coburn, Frederick Simpson (1871-1960)

  • 1993_090
  • Person
  • 1871-1960

Frederick S. Coburn was born in Upper Melbourne, Québec in 1871. He studied art in Montréal, New York, Berlin , London and Antwerp. He was an extremely accomplished artist but perhaps was best know for his winter landscapes with horses. A.R.C.A. 1920, R.C.A. 1927. He died in his Melbourne studio in 1960.

Simon, Peter James (1950- )

  • 1994_003
  • Person
  • 1950-

James Simon was born in Montréal in 1950. He has been painting official portraits and portrait art since 1984.
Source: James Simon 2011 www.jamessimon.com

Simon, Peter James (1950-)

  • 1996_009
  • Person
  • 1950-

James Simon was born in Montréal in 1950. He has been painting official portraits and portrait art since 1984.
Source: James Simon 2011 www.jamessimon.com

Fraser, Juliette May (1887-1983)

  • 1996_008
  • Person
  • 1887- 1983

Honolulu-born artist Juliette May Fraser is perhaps best known for the murals she painted around the world. She also portrayed Hawaiian legends and other themes through linoleum cut, oil painting, ceramic, and fresco.

Juliette May Fraser was born on January 27, 1887 in Honolulu. After graduating from Wellesley College in Massachusetts, she worked as an educator, like her mother and father who had come to the islands to teach. "That was practically the only thing a woman could do then," she told an interviewer a few years before her death in 1983. But her heart since childhood had been captured by art, so she saved her salary to study at the Art Students League in New York.
Fraser is also noted for her print-works, and was associated with Honolulu Print-makers, which is said to be the oldest continuously active printmaking organization in the United States. The group was founded in 1928 by a group of local artists in an effort to encourage the art of printmaking in Hawaii. Each year, one of the organization's members is selected to create a special print. Along with Juliette May Fraser, some of the print-makers of yesteryear - John Melville Kelly, Huc-Mazelet Luquiens, Cornelia Macintyre Foley, Isami Doi, Madge Tennant, Jean Charlot, John Young and others - became world-renowned artists, their prints now demanding much higher sums than the original $5 price.

Juliette May Fraser died in July of 1983 in Honolulu, Hawaii.
Source: Excerpted from The Annex Galleries https://www.annexgalleries.com/artists/biography/740/Fraser/Juliette

Kelly, John Melville (1877-1962)

  • 1996_007
  • Person
  • 1877-1962

John Melville Kelly was born in Oakland, California on November 2, 1877. Raised on a ranch outside of Phoenix, Arizona, Kelly decided to return to the Bay Area as a young adult to pursue an education in art and design. He studied at the Mark Hopkins Institute of Art and the Partington Art School, and with artist Eric Spencer Mackey. Kelly's work as a freelance artist came on the heels of a fourteen year career as an illustrator and graphic designer for the San Francisco Examiner. In 1923 developer Charles Frazier offered Kelly an opportunity to illustrate Frazier's Lanikai building plans. It was meant to last a year, but Kelly and his wife, sculptor Kate Kelly, ended up staying there after falling in love with the landscape and people of the islands.

It was Kate's pursuit of printmaking, under the tutelage of Huc-Mazelet Luquiens, that sparked John's own interest in the decidedly different artistic medium. John began pursuing etching with great interest, eventually working almost exclusively in dry-point and then aquatint. His work shows his fascination with the subtlety allowed in the aquatint technique, his experiment with the manipulation of color directly on the plate producing a tonal effect not achieved with etching. His subject matter was nearly entirely images of the people and surroundings he'd grown to love. John Kelly was the author and illustrator of "Etchings and Drawings of Hawaiians" published in 1943 and also "The Hula as Seen in Hawaii" published in 1955.
The Hawaii State Art Museum, the Honolulu Academy of Arts, and the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art (Kansas City, Missouri), Saint Joseph College Art Gallery (West Hartford, Connecticut) and the San Diego Museum of Art (San Diego, California) are among the public collections holding his work. John Melville Kelly died in Honolulu, Hawaii, USA in on September 9, 1962.
Source: The Annex Galleries https://www.annexgalleries.com/artists/biography/1222/Kelly/John

Bartlett, Charles William (1860-1940)

  • Person
  • 1860-1940

Charles Bartlett was born in England in 1860. He began his education with the intention of becoming a chemist, but switched to fine art, enrolling at the Academy of Art in London at the age of twenty-three. From there he went to Paris to further his studies at the Academie Julian. After he lost his wife and infant son in childbirth, the artist spent a year traveling in Europe with fellow artist Frank Brangwyn. It was at this time that his work maintained a focus on the daily lives of peasant women and children, and began to hone his watercolor and drawing techniques. It wouldn't be until much later that Bartlett, now returned to England and remarried, would discover his love of printmaking and the landscape subject matter he would become known for.
In 1913 he and his wife traveled to Ceylon, Indonesia, and China to sketch and paint. 1915 hailed their arrival in Japan, where they met Austrian artist Fritz Capelari who introduced them to publisher Watanabe Shozaburo. Watanabe and Bartlett began a long collaboration in which Watanabe would turn the watercolor landscapes of Bartlett's into color woodcuts; soon, Bartlett himself would use Watanabe's studio to carve and create his own woodblocks.
In 1917, the Bartlett's traveled to Hawaii, intending to make a short visit. However, they fell in love with the landscape and community where they were visiting, and soon established their lives and Charles' career there. He became a co-founder of the Honolulu Print-makers and a prominent member of Hawaii's artistic community until his death in 1940 at the age of eighty.
Sources include: Peter Falk, Who Was Who in American Art David Forbes, Encounters With Paradise. Sources: Sarah Nelson, Douglas Frazer Fine Art www.askart.com
Source: Annex Galleries https://www.annexgalleries.com/artists/biography/129/Bartlett/Charles

Miller, Lilian May (1895-1943)

  • 1995_006
  • Person
  • 1895-1943

Born in Japan in 1895, Miller was the daughter of an American consular official. She received training in Japanese painting styles at an early age, and after schooling in America returned to Japan for more painting studies. She published many of her prints in the 20's and 30's, and later moved to Hawaii. She died in 1943 during the time of the second war.
Source: Woodblock.com http://woodblock.com/encyclopedia/entries/017_02/miller.html

Foley, Cornelia Macintyre (1909-2010)

  • 1996_004
  • Person
  • 1909-2010

Cornelia MacIntyre Foley (1909-2010) was born in Honolulu, Hawaiʻi, began her art training under Huc-Mazelet Luquiens at the University of Hawaiʻi, continued at the University of Washington, and spent two years in London at the Slade School as a pupil of Henry Tonks. She returned to Honolulu in 1934, whereupon she befriended and studied under Madge Tennent. In 1937, she married Paul Foley, a lieutenant in the Navy. From 1937 to 1942, the couple lived in Long Beach, California, and Seattle, Washington. Her oils and acrylics include portraits and landscapes. Besides numerous exhibitions around the country, her artwork is held in public places such as the Honolulu Museum of Art, the National Print Collection at the Library of Congress, and the University of Hawaiʻi.
With an extraordinary mastery of figurative drawing, Foley was able to fuse the sensuous with the hypnotic in her unique views of the human essence. Her famous Hawaiian Woman in White Holoku (1937, Honolulu Academy of Arts) epitomizes the elements of her drawn and painted works, which continue to enchant and inspire viewers to this day. She died in 2010.
Isaacs Art Center http://isaacsartcenter.hpa.edu/artist-works.php?artistId=170274&artist=Cornelia%20MacIntyre%20Foley%20(1909-2010)

Luquiens, Huc-Mazelet (1881-1961)

  • 1996_003
  • Person
  • 1881-1961

Printmaker Huc-Mazelet Luquiens was born in Massachusetts in 1881, grew up in New England, and attended Yale University before moving to Paris to study art. He came to Hawaii in 1917, where he taught art at the university of Hawaii in 1925 – the first year the subject was offered at the school. Eventually, he became head of the art department and was largely responsible for attracting qualified instructors and pupils.

In New England, Luquiens had focused primarily on portraiture and architectural subjects. In Hawaii he discovered a newfound passion for landscapes, being a major voice in community affairs concerning nature during the decade he resided there. In this time he created 330 etchings, drypoints, aquatints and woodcuts, and co-founded the organization of "Honolulu Printmakers", which continues today.He died in 1961. He remains a major figure in the art history of Hawaii.
Source: The Annex Galleries : https://www.annexgalleries.com/artists/biography/1459/Luquiens/Huc-Mazelet

Martin, John Allen

  • Person
  • 1926-2001

John Allen Martin, son of John F. Martin and Elsie M. Batley, was born on 16 June 1926 in Bury. He grew up in Bury but had a career as an accountant in Montreal, Sherbrooke and East Angus before retiring in 1983. He was admitted into several professional organizations including the Institute of Charted Accountants in 1950, the Society of Industrial and Cost Accountants in 1957, and the Chartered Institute of Secretaries in 1958. As a member of the Liberal Party, Allen Martin was the director of the Liberal Federal Association for Megantic Compton-Stanstead and involved in the federal and provincial elections in 1980s. He was also very active in the community such as helping to organize the Canada Day celebrations and Bury anniversaries. He was the founding member of the Megantic-Compton Cemetery and Church Association, the president of Bury Athletic Association and also served as a board member of the Société d'Histoire et du Patrimoine du Haut-Saint-François. Allen Martin died on 24 February 2001 at the age of 74.

Burrell, Alfred Ray (1877-1952)

  • 1996_002
  • Person
  • 1877-1952

Alfred Ray Burrell was born in Oakland, California in1877. He studied in San-Francisco at the Partington Art School and Mark Hopkins Institute (1898) and in New York City with William Merritt Chase and Frank DuMond. Upon his return he studied engineering at University of California at Berkeley and worked for ten years with his father in the contracting and heavy construction business. Yielding to the desire to work as an artist, he then returned to New York City where he worked as an illustrator, taught at the Art Students' League and was head of the art department at A.W. Shaw Publishing Company until 1919.
Burrell then spent four years as a member of the faculty at the Hawaiian School of Design in Honolulu. Returning to San Francisco, he continued teaching at the California College of Arts and Crafts and assisted Frank Van Sloun in painting the murals in Bohemian club and in the rotunda of the Palace of Fine Arts (1936). Burrell was prominent in the art world of San-Francisco contributing greatly as a teacher and exhibiting locally until his death on 1952.
Source: Excerpted from The Annex Galleries Alfred Ray Burrell Biography https://www.annexgalleries. com/artists/biography/330/Burrell/Alfred

MacLeod, Alexander Samuel (1888-1956)

  • 1996_001
  • Person
  • 1888-1956

Alexander Samuel MacLeod also known a A.S. MacLeod was painter and print-maker. A Canadian by birth, Mr. MacLeod studied art in San Francisco, was with the A.E. F. in wartime France, doing mapping and panoramic sketching with the Engineers. He went to Honolulu in 1921 and this is where he had has made his best known pictures in watercolour, oil and lithography. He has won prizes with the California Society of Etchers in 1930 and with the Northwest Print Makers in 1934. He retired to Palo Alto California where he died in 1956.
Source: Excerpted from article from Honolulu Print Makers.

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